4 Simple and Fun Summer Photography Projects for Kids (+ Fourth of July Prop Ideas)

Not only is photography a fun hobby for kids, but it’s been proven to have a positive impact on their development. Photography can help develop kids’ visual-spatial skills, stimulate creativity and imagination among many other benefits. (Parents.com) 

Below are 4 simple and fun photography projects and ideas on how to explore each further. You can explore several at the same time or focus on the one that interests your child the most.

DIY Photo Props

Photo Scavenger Hunt

Photography Alphabet and Colors

Close-ups and Macro Photographs

Final Thoughts

DIY Photo Props

How about a DIY family photo shoot this weekend? You can even involve the kids in planning the shoot and helping to make some photo props at home. In our previous blog post on tips for amazing photos, we mentioned that incorporating props can offer variety and make it more fun for the kids. 

What You Need

  • Use materials that you already have at home that are readily available and affordable. This will give leeway to the kids to have fun making the props.
  • You also want to keep the prop designs simple so that the kids can make them on their own with less assistance from you. 

Ideas for Fun Fourth of July and Summer Photos

  1. Creative photo booth props are perfect for your July 4th patriotic holiday mood. Download the Free July 4th Photo Props Design Ideas shown below. You can make basic outlines for them on heavier paper or poster board and let them color in the designs or use construction paper shapes. Then have the kids tape them to wooden skewers, straws, chopsticks, or popsicle sticks. It’s so simple and within a couple of minutes, you have some great photo props! 
  2. You can also incorporate fun activities that make for great expressions and add interest to the images for your photo album. Some of my favorites include bringing out water balloons, sprinklers, bubbles, popsicles, and ice cream cones. 

Photo Scavenger Hunt

A photo scavenger hunt is a great way to keep kids busy and active while you’re grillin’ or chillin’. 

What You Need

  • One camera (e.g smartphone camera, digital camera, iPad) per kid
  • Location of the hunt. Specify an area of the house, your backyard, or any other safe location.
  • A printed or written list of clues of things to take photos of for each child.

The Activity

  1. Keep the list short and simple for young kids. Also, choose large items that are easily photographed, and be specific about the details to photograph. Examples include rocks, flowers, and toys.
  2. For older kids who need more of a challenge, try using riddles or creative clues that require some thought. For example, have them photograph two things that have names that rhyme, look like each letter of the alphabet or start with each letter of the alphabet.
  3. Give out the clues, explain the rules, including the physical boundaries and time limit. Ensure an adult is around to supervise the activity.
  4. Let them have fun!
  5. When the time limit is up, or the clues have all been found, have a “judge” decide if each photo is a correct match to the corresponding clue.
  6. It can be a competition or a group challenge, whichever works better for your kids.  

photo-scavenger-hunt-kids

Photo scavenger hunts like these not only give children a purpose for being out in the fresh air, they help them look at and observe the world around them.

Photography Alphabet and Colors

This is great for young kids who are learning their ABCs or colors

What You Need

  • One camera (e.g smartphone camera, kids camera ) per kid
  • A piece of paper and a pen to take a tally of the letters, phrases or colors

The Activity

  1. Have the child move around the house and photograph an item for each of the letters of the alphabet.
  2. To make it more challenging have them try to photograph different items for each letter that makes up a phrase.
  3. Have the child walk around the house or backyard and look for things of a certain color and photograph them.
  4. Kids can pick their favorite color and photograph 20 things that are all that color.

Close-ups and Macro Photographs

Close-ups and true macro photographs often reveal a world that we would ordinarily overlook. The majority of macro photos taken are of flowers and insects. But that’s not the limit, there are interesting macro scenes everywhere.  This makes it easy for kids to delve into macro photography projects.

What You Need

  • A  digital camera or smartphone and a macro lens.
  •  If more than one child is involved, they can take turns 

The Activity

  1. Help your child come up with ideas for close-up shots.
  2. You don’t have to move far, your house and backyard alone will offer many options
  3. A few ideas to get you going include fruits and vegetables. Slice them up and let the kids take macro photos of the inside. If the camera won’t allow you to get super close, get as close as possible while still being able to focus. 
  4. Have the child walk around your living space and see what could be interesting if they get very close.
  5. Objects in nature work wonder for macro photography ideas. Leaves are great because they come in many different types, colors, and sizes.

closeups-macro-photography

Macro photography may seem challenging at first, but once they get the hang of it, kids love it. It may help to explain it as what do you think bugs see when they look at ______(fill in the blank) It’s great because you don’t need a lot of equipment. A camera or a smartphone should do the trick!

Final Thoughts

As we celebrate Independence Day this Friday, I think so many of us reflect back on family traditions. Maybe there’s a certain food or meal you looked forward to growing up or you loved staying up late to see the fireworks and snuggle under the stars, this is your chance to capture those memories for your children to help them remember what made this holiday special for them through photos. The Family Yearbook is a great way to celebrate an entire year of special moments with you and your crew. It’s easier than you think. Click here for more info.

© 2020 Our Family Yearbook. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED